Drug Delivery Materials

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Not only would a network of nanofibers (or nanoparticles) provide a stable 3D scaffold on which cells would attach, they could also be used to encapsulate a drug which would favor the proliferation and avoid de-differentiation of the given cells (ie: chondrocytes). A whole variety of drugs could theoretically be integrated ranging from growth factors to bioactive small molecules.

Figure 3: Bright field image of PMMA scaffold loaded with fluorescein, embedded in an agarose gel. This image is a Z-stack processed in Fiji, frame 0 corresponds to Z=0um, frame 200 corresponds to z=718um.
Figure 3: Bright field image of PMMA scaffold loaded with fluorescein, embedded in an agarose gel. This image is a Z-stack processed in Fiji, frame 0 corresponds to Z=0um, frame 200 corresponds to z=718um.

With a well-thought polymer blend and a suitable drug cocktail, a custom drug-release profile could be created for various tissue engineering applications. For example in the case of cartilage, a multistep drug-release profile is an attractive prospective. A first drug would be released in the days following the implantation and a slower, more sustained release of a second drug lasting several weeks/months.

Contact:

ETH Zurich

Gewebetechnol. und Biofabrikation

Florian Formica

HPL J 12

Otto-Stern-Weg 7

8093 Zürich

Switzerland

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Wed Jun 28 09:45:28 CEST 2017
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